Movie Review: “To All the Boys: Always and Forever”

“To All The Boys: Always and Forever” depicts a more accurate sense of the teenager’s experience in high school.

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Photo by Nathan Dumlao: The movie series does hit on some very accurate depictions of life as a teenager, though. 

By Abigail Morin | armorin1@radford.edu

Teen movies are notorious for having cast members that are well above teen ages playing teenage characters. The “To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before” series is no exception, with only one character under 20.

The most recent movie, “To All the Boys: Always and Forever,” in the series is no stranger to the typical teen movie tropes – the on again off again relationship of the main characters, the pressure for characters to take their relationship to the next level on prom night, and, last but not least, the “should I go to a college I don’t want to go to for the sake of my boyfriend?” scenario. 

[epq-quote align=”align-left”]A significant topic in high school is plans post-graduation.[/epq-quote]

While this movies still make me think, “well, that’s not what an actual high school is like,” there were surprisingly few moments during the two hours that I wanted to roll my eyes genuinely.

And I have seen countless teen movies that are incredibly cringy, where the acting seems very forced and odd, leaving you with an uncomfortable feeling that now would be called “cringe-worthy.”

The movie series does hit on some very accurate depictions of life as a teenager, though. 

In the first two movies, private videos are taken without the two characters’ knowledge and spread around the school, painful breakups that seem to be the end of the world, struggles in family life, and all-in-all, just trying to figure out how to become a person are featured.

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Photo by Fadi Xd: I have seen countless teen movies that are incredibly cringy.

Everything is a big deal when you’re a teenager, especially in high school, and this series tends to hit those points perfectly.

A significant topic in high school is plans post-graduation.

Some may be going into trades, working, college, or even taking a gap year. However, if there is a couple involved, the decision has to be made to either go to college with each other, split up, or try to make it work long distance. 

Typically, a long-distance relationship is hard and often doesn’t last, especially if the relationship is between teenagers. This is a major theme in the movie, and I feel like it handles it well.

[epq-quote align=”align-right”]There have been many teen movies where if someone is moving or going to college far away and they fall into a romance, they change their plans and stay with the other person. [/epq-quote]

There have been many teen movies where if someone is moving or going to college far away and they fall into a romance, they change their plans and stay with the other person. 

This often leaves me wanting to scream at the TV because, obviously, high school relationships seldom last, and the character shouldn’t be changing their plans like that. “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,” however, is a nice change to the exhausted theme of young love.

Maybe this series will be an inspiration to young people everywhere that they shouldn’t change their future for a teenage romance; if it is meant to be, then it’ll happen. 

Hopefully, teen movies everywhere will start to change and adopt the new realistic view of being young and a realistic view of high schools. 

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