Tie-Dye Shirts at The Bonnie

Radford has many opportunities for people come together as a school. On March 9 the Bonnie had a Radford Tie Dye Event.

Woman near bench

Stephanie Perez models a tie-dye shirt she made.

By Stephanie Perez | scperez@radford.edu

Radford has many opportunities for people to come together as a school. Last week was a clear example as Tie-dye shirts flooded the Bonnie area.

It was first come, first serve, so there was no need to make appointments. Many students spoke about how they saw it in flyers in The Bonnie, the chalk markings on the ground, or getting food and seeing other students doing it.

[epq-quote align=”align-left”]It was very intriguing watching all kinds of students make a shirt that was just right for them.[/epq-quote]

No matter how the student got there, you could have a blast there. It was very intriguing watching all kinds of students make a shirt that was just right for them.

When you first walk up to them, you saw a massive tent with many shirts and dye colors.

Before I could pick a size, I had to complete a small survey on my phone. I scanned a QR code with my camera, which started the process. It only took two seconds, and the survey was about how I found them, what my email was, and similar things like that. After I finished, I went up to a lady to pick a shirt size and a design.

Something disappointing was that they only had small, medium, and large. There was no x-small, x-large, or xx-large, forcing some students to go with the next best thing.

[epq-quote align=”align-right”]Once I told the lady my shirt size, it was time to pick from three designs. There was a Spiral, Crumple, and Bulleyes option.[/epq-quote]

Once I told the lady my shirt size, it was time to pick from three designs. There was a Spiral, Crumple, and Bulleyes option.

When I started, I placed my shirt into a bucket that was full of water for five minutes. The water had some materials that help bring out the color. Lucky, it was a sunny day so you could enjoy the sun while you wait.

Even though we had to social distance from the other people, I would see people talking about what design they were going to do.

In all honesty, it did bring people together, even while socially distancing.

Spiral is the most common design that I saw people making or wearing.

[epq-quote align=”align-left”]Spiral is the most common design that I saw people making or wearing.[/epq-quote]

In this design, you need to find the center of the shirt and twist it into a perfect circle. Then you would use three rubber bands, and to hold them in place, they would be crisscrossing, so it looks like there are six rubber bands. You would put the dye on the white spots that were showing and alternate sections.

The crumple was the second most popular design that I saw used. This design involved no rubber bands. Instead, someone would just crumple the shirt and put the dye on. They would then crush it again and repeat the process.

Crumple was definitely one of the messy ones. Yet, it took a lot of artisttic talent because people would need to mix the correct colors that go together. Then they need to make sure they crumpled it the way they wanted, making sure that the white leftover complements the colors they chose.

Another popular one was called Bullseye, where someone would pinch the fabric at the center of where the ‘bullseye’ would be. I saw many people choosing this because it was fun to put as many rubber bands as you want.

[epq-quote align=”align-right”]Another popular one was called Bullseye, where someone would pinch the fabric at the center of where the ‘bullseye’ would be.[/epq-quote]

Once I finished making my design, I put my shirt in a ziplock bag and waited until the next day. The ladies in charge gave instructions so that we can complete the process at home or in dorms. 

In my opinion, it was the hardest part because I did not want to go out and buy gloves. To finish the shirt, people were instructed to rinse it in cold water while talking off the rubber bands if they had any, then continue to wash it until the water is clear. Then I washed it with hot water and used liquid soap.

Viola! After it dried, I had a tie-dye shirt that I made.

The ladies who were helping the Radford students were both from Florida. They have done many events like that.

They did many occasions for many places and were thankful to have an opportunity to do an event again at Radford. Hopefully, we will see them very soon.

This was a genuinely great experience.

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