Renown Wildlife Artist Featured at Glencoe Museum

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By: Margaret Pittman | mpittman9@radford.edu

Radford’s historic landmark, the Glencoe Mansion Museum and Gallery, which celebrated its 20th-anniversary last year, introduced a new wildlife art exhibit last Tuesday.

The new art gallery features paintings from Ray Harm, a famed wildlife painter who spent over 50 years as an artist before he died in 2015.

This gallery comes as a donation from Jon and Mary Wyatt, avid wildlife art collectors, and contains approximately 100 wildlife art prints by Harm and other artists.

According to Harm’s website, his artwork is considered to embody the “true spirit of the fine art creative process.” This is because he would use sketches from locations as his reference, and would never use photographs.

To welcome its guests, the museum previewed some of the new artwork. Since the prints could be purchased, the mansion explained them in-depth to possible interested buyers.

Knowing the events that were happening as he created his artwork adds new layers to its beauty. It’s intriguing to see how art can hold much more than one sees on at first.

Afterward, an opening reception was held following an informative lecture by Clyde Kessler, a local bird expert, who discussed the various bird species in the New River Valley.

Kessler described the types of birds common in the area and delved into each one’s unique qualities and explained how they can be natural assets.

Glencoe Museum basement
Photo Credit: (Glencoe Mansion) Jon and Mary Wyatt with museum director Scott Gardner in the finished basement of the Glencoe Mansion where they display the gallery.

Harm’s prints are well detailed and look like something from a nature textbook or magazine. Many of his paintings include a single species of bird with a plain white background to emphasize its qualities and size.

Half of his other pieces of art are drawings composed of multiple animals with a background of their common habitat or environment.

With his experience in studying the behavior and habitats of animals, Harm captured with precision each detail in his featured prints.

Harm was raised in Kentucky and was a World War 2 veteran. After going to art school, he began releasing his Fine Art Limited Edition Prints in 1963, an industry-standard that he pioneered.

Knowing the events that were happening as he created his artwork adds new layers to its beauty. It’s intriguing to see how art can hold much more than one sees at first.

The gallery holds much more than just wildlife art; there is a good variety of pieces that brings a lot to Radford.

The paintings will remain until Nov. 1. The art pieces are still available for sale at the Glencoe Mansion Museum or through the Ray Harm website.

For more coverage of Radford art, stay connected with your Tartan newspaper.

Photo credit: (The Glencoe Mansion)

Featured image: (Jon and Mary Wyatt present Harm’s print of a Cougar, which demonstrates his clean style of a detailed animal on a white background.)

Margaret Pittman

Hello, I am Margaret. I am a freshman at Radford and like to write a little too.