Germany 1945: The ‘Zero Hour’ and German Nationalism

2 min read The World War II 75th anniversary series continues with the newest presentation, “Germany 1945: the ‘Zero Hour’ and German Nationalism.”

Auschwitz

Photo Credit: (Karsten Winegeart) Auschwitz.

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By McKenzie Lewis | mlewis99@radford.edu

The College of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences (CHBS) continues the World War II 75th anniversary series with their newest presentation, “Germany 1945: the ‘Zero Hour’ and German Nationalism,” Wednesday, Oct. 28, 4 p.m.

The event is over Zoom and presented by Dr. Mike Montgomery, Radford University Associate Professor of History. 

The event is over Zoom and presented by Dr. Mike Montgomery, Radford University Associate Professor of History. 

According to an email sent out by CHBS, “This series is sponsored by the Department of History, the College of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences, and McConnell Library.”

The World War II series, which commemorates the 75th anniversary of World War II, started Aug. 26 with “An Archaeological and Geophysical Expedition to Guadalcanal” and ends Nov. 11 with “Posters Go to War: Visual Narratives of Trauma, Part II.”

“Germany 1945: the ‘Zero Hour’ and German Nationalism” will cover the Zero Hour in Germany and the nationalist tactics found in Nazi Germany.

Seaman
Photo Credit: (Museums Victoria) HMAS Australia, Portrait of a Seaman, 1915.

According to Deutsche Welle (DW), an independent media outlet in Germany, “The immediate postwar desolation became known colloquially as ‘Stunde Null,'” or “Hour Zero” in German. 

“Adolf Hitler, terrified of the prospect of being captured alive or being held accountable for millions of murders, had married his partner Eva Braun and then the two died by suicide shortly before the Battle of Berlin was decided,” DW said. Their deaths were considered a part of Zero Hour.

The series has covered Enigma and the Navajo code in recent weeks – Both were presentations on coding during World War II. 

Enigma was another German creation that encoded all of their messages to keep the allies at bay.

Russia
Photo Credit: (Austrian National Library) 1917, Picture of life in the field and shelters at the Russian theater of war.

The Enigma presentation was my favorite. Considering myself a buff on World War II, I thought there was not much information I did not know. The Enigma presentation taught me many new things about the German code.

The events have all been insightful, provided interesting information, and looked into ordinary people’s lives 75 years ago.

Students must go to this link to join the Zoom room and follow the steps at 4 p.m.

For more information on the series and this specific presentation, you can go to the Department of History website. Any questions can be directed to Suzanne Ament at seament@radford.edu or Matt Oyos at moyos@radford.edu.

McKenzie Lewis
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