COVID-19 Spike: Confusion Among Quarantine Procedures

3 min read As Coronavirus cases surge at Radford University, students begin to question mandated quarantine procedures.

COVID-19 Testing

Photo Credit: (Dylan Lepore) Students getting tested for COVID-19 Aug. 28 on Moffett law.

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By Isabella Dominesey l Idominesey@radford.edu

As numerous Radford University students contract the Coronavirus, the recommended quarantine procedures for those surrounding them still remain unclear to some.

Allegedly Wallace wasn’t told directly by the university to quarantine herself or get tested but recently began having mild symptoms. “I put all of my symptoms in the Symptom Tracker and still got the green check as an okay,” Wallace said.According to the data posted on Radford’s COVID-19 Dashboard, around 195 new students tested positive, as of Tuesday, Sept. 1. A drastic climb compared to the original reported 11 cases initially listed on Wednesday, Aug. 12.

With the number of cases rising, so is the level of concern from students. 

Many roommates, friends, and classmates who tested positive are seemingly beginning to worry about their health and question whether they should leave their rooms.

Junior Addison Wallace, who recently came into close contact with a classmate who tested positive for COVID-19, finds herself in that exact position.

Photo Credit: (Dylan Lepore) A long line of students getting tested for COVID-19 Aug. 28 on Moffett law.

“Students would be notified by their medical and/or testing provider or the VHD (Virginia Department of Health) regarding the need to quarantine,” Caitlyn Scaggs, Associate Vice President for University Relations, said. “They can also be contacted by VDH to quarantine due to being identified as close contact to someone who tested positive.”“We had some classes together, and we were in the same room about two weeks ago while we ate lunch without masks,” Wallace said. “I live alone, so I am basically quarantining, but I have been going to classes.”

Allegedly Wallace wasn’t told directly by the university to quarantine herself or get tested but recently began having mild symptoms. “I put all of my symptoms in the Symptom Tracker and still got the green check as an okay,” Wallace said.

Although her Symptom Tracker results said “all good today,” Wallace decided to make an appointment for a test.

She got tested Wednesday, Aug. 26, and is currently waiting for her results.

Radford’s goal, as stated on Radford University’s Campus Reopening webpage, remains “to protect and promote the health, safety, and well-being of the campus and the community.”

Radford University says it relies heavily on communication between health professionals and themselves.

“Students would be notified by their medical and/or testing provider or the VHD (Virginia Department of Health) regarding the need to quarantine,” Caitlyn Scaggs, Associate Vice President for University Relations, said. “They can also be contacted by VDH to quarantine due to being identified as close contact to someone who tested positive.”

However, if not contacted by a medical provider or the VDH, Scaggs says students may elect to self-quarantine.

The university is also aware that many students test through private providers and is strongly encouraging them to provide those results through the Dean of Students Office. “Self- reporting from these students is required in order for the University to have knowledge of the status of all students,” Scaggs said.

Photo Credit: (Dylan Lepore) Students getting tested for COVID-19 Aug. 28 on Moffett law.