Breaking Enigma: WWII 75th Anniversary

2 min read Radford University remembers World War II with the presentation of “Breaking Enigma: The Bletchley Park Codebreakers and the Turing Bombe.”

Enigma codebreaking machine

Photo Credit: (Mauro Sbicego) The Enigma codebreaking machine helped bring an end to World War II.

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By McKenzie Lewis | mlewis99@radford.edu

The Radford University College of Humanities and Behavioral Sciences continues its recognition of the 75th anniversary of World War II with the latest presentation, “Breaking Enigma: The Bletchley Park Codebreakers and the Turning Bombe,” Oct. 7 at 4 p.m.

Breaking enigma to track German messages and bring an end to the war became a driving force.

According to Britannica, enigma was a “device used by the German military command to encode strategic messages before and during World War II.” It helped to throw the Allies off Germany’s trail and made it nearly impossible to figure out their strategy.

During World War II, breaking enigma to track German messages and bring an end to the war became a driving force, according to Imperial War Museums. A man named Alan Turing led efforts to break the code and became a vital piece to the war’s end.

Radford is offering this event to all students. To register for in-person attendance, you can go to WWII Codebreakers and follow the instructions to attend. If you wish to participate in person, be sure to register ahead of time as there is limited seating due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Alan Turing led efforts to break the code and became a vital piece to the war’s end.

In an email sent out from the university Oct. 1, a Zoom link is provided for those unable to attend in person. You can join the meeting by following that link to the forum and participate from there.

Students can find more information on the World War II series at the Department of History website. Students can also direct comments or questions to Suzanne Ament (seament@radford.edu) or Matt Oyos (moyos@radford.edu).

McKenzie Lewis
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