Amy Coney Barrett: College Raises Attention To Nominee’s Abortion Stance

2 min read President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett received criticism from her former undergrad college for her potential appointment.

Amy Coney Barrett

Photo Credit: (Rachel Malehorn ) Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump's upcoming nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, recently faced criticism from her alma mater about her stance on abortion rights.

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By Wesley Wallace | wwallace5@radford.edu

Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s upcoming nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, recently faced criticism from her alma mater about her stance on abortion rights.

More than 1,500 alumni from Rhodes College signed a letter of concern regarding Barrett’s potential appointment.

The letter was written by Rhodes College alumni Rob Marcus and Katherine Morgan. They voiced their opinions regarding Barrett’s political stance on the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the LGBTQ community, and abortion law.

They voiced their opinions regarding Barrett’s political stance on the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the LGBTQ community, and abortion law.

The letter states, “We are likewise firmly and passionately opposed to Rhodes administrators’ attempts to embrace Amy Coney Barrett as an alumna of our beloved alma mater.”

It continues with, “We oppose this embrace because we believe both her record and the process that has produced her nomination are diametrically opposed to the values of truth, loyalty, and service that we learned at Rhodes.”

According to NPR, during the 2016 Presidential debates between President Donald Trump and former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton, President Trump publicly stated that he would only appoint Supreme Court Justices who would vote to rescind the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.

Trump stated, “That will happen automatically, in my opinion, because I am putting pro-life justices on the court … I will say this: It will go back to the states, and the states will then make a determination.”

The US Supreme Court
Photo Credit: (Claire Anderson) The United States Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.

The Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision makes it legal for women to get abortions across the country.

During a 2016 lecture on the fate of the supreme court at Jacksonville University, Barrett answered the question of whether or not the Supreme Court would allow states to pass more abortion restrictions.

“I don’t think the core case- Roe‘s core holding that, you know, women have a right to an abortion-I don’t think that would change,” Barrett stated. “But I think the question of whether people can get very late-term abortions, how many restrictions can be put on clinics- I think that would change,” Barrett said.

If Barrett is selected to replace former Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Republican party will have a 6-3 majority in the Supreme Court.