A Thank You Note To The Boys: The Diamond in a Desert of an Over Saturated Genre

2 min read One of the greatest shows to be out right now is The Boys. This grand action-satire has flopped the superhero genre on its head.

Superheroes

Photo Credit: (Amazon Originals The Boys) We recommend binge-watching this show immediately.

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Michael Aaron Coopersmith | mcoopersmith@radford.edu 

One of the greatest shows out right now is The Boys. Those not familiar with the action-satire have been missing out.

The show takes place in a universe where superpowered individuals are recognized as heroes by the general public. They work for the ever-powerful corporation Vought International which profits off the heroes through film deals and merchandising.

Yet, there is a darker facet to these so-called “heroes.” With all their fame and power before them, the majority lead dark; they live corrupted lives.

In this day and age, theaters have become bombarded by an oversaturation of generic superhero plots: men and women who triumph over the designated antagonist by the end of two hours.

One of the main protagonists, Hughie Campbell, loses his girlfriend because of an accident one of the seven heroes caused, A-Train. Upset about this, he joins William Butcher (played by Karl Urban), who plans on taking down the seven top heroes of Vought International.

Campbell would later find out that the accident was due to a drug-fueled mistake by A-Train. With each episode, Campbell dives deeper into this dark world that hides behind the masks of heroes.

In this day and age, theaters have become bombarded by an oversaturation of generic superhero plots: men and women who triumph over the designated antagonist by the end of two hours. Marvel’s claim to fame is that they did it in five instead of doing it in two hours.

This romanticism is usual for anyone, especially when Marvel’s first film came out when most fans were in elementary school. So, having been around since the inception of Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, one can relish the satire and dark humor that The Boys carries.

We get to see a world shaped by these factors, by the world we live in—just a breath of realism that I have been dying to experience in a film or TV series.

Seeing this mash of realism and parody makes you believe that a man like Superman wouldn’t be a morally righteous figure, or Wayne Corp. wouldn’t fund the Justice league without business interests considered. We get to see a world shaped by these factors, by the world we live in—just a breath of realism that I have been dying to experience in a film or TV series.

In the second season, one doesn’t feel overstimulated by good or evil encompassed within one character. 

Every character lingers in a moral grey that fits perfectly. The show is a diamond in the rough. So, I must say, thank you.