Weather Alert: The 2020 Hurricane Season is Likely to be Above Average

2 min read Summer is on the horizon, bringing severe weather with it such as hurricanes, a primary threat during the season.

Hurricane

Photo Credit: (NASA on Unsplash) Yemen Hurricane map.

Last Updated on

1496 views

By: Dustin Staples | dstaples1@radford.edu

Summer is on the horizon, bringing severe weather with it such as hurricanes, a primary threat during the season.

Even though the start of the Atlantic Hurricane season is less than two months from starting, prediction forecasts are already being made.

According to a 35-page report by the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University (CSU), “We anticipate that the 2020 Atlantic Basin hurricane season will have above-normal activity.”

The future outlook that is used by CSU is based on a 30-year average of several factors, which data is then collected over time.

The forecast calls for 16 named storms, eight hurricanes, and four major hurricanes that have already been named. Per the National Hurricane Center, tropical cyclones in the Atlantic during 2020 will be designated as follows:

  1. Arthur
  2. Bertha
  3. Cristobal
  4. Dolly
  5. Edouard
  6. Fay
  7. Gonzalo
  8. Hanna
  9. Isaias
  10. Josephine
  11. Kyle
  12. Laura
  13. Marco
  14. Nana
  15. Omar
  16. Paulette
  17. Rene
  18. Sally
  19. Teddy
  20. Vicky
  21. Wilfred

The season starts on June 1 and runs through Nov. 30.

A few things to keep a watch on this summer are the water temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean and especially the Gulf of Mexico, and areas in or around a tropical region tend to be warmer and show increasing signs of tropical development for a tropical storm or hurricane.

According to long-range forecast models, a warm neutral phase will start the first half of the season, then transition to a cooler neutral phase or the La Nina phase, which means active and cooler water temperatures.

Also, due to the wind shift, this can enhance more activity in the Atlantic Basin to form hurricanes or tropical storms quicker.

The next updates from CSU on future weather conditions will come July 7 and Aug. 6, 2020.

Photo Credit: (NASA on Unsplash)